Posts Tagged ‘disruptive’

Disrupt yourself

Interesting interview with Ford CEO Mark Fields on looking into new business models and making the company ready for the future. Ford has recently spun-off their next generation mobility services into a new company. More and more leading car OEs and suppliers are trying to leverage the environment in the  Silicon Valley in order to embrace change and explore new business fields. Disruption of an existing industry happens in most cases due to new entrants from the outside, and the classic players in the Automotive industry have to get ready.

 

Our approach is to first, disrupt ourselves. That’s why you see us creating things like Ford Smart Mobility, the LLC, creating FordPass, really thinking differently about this from a consumer-end standpoint. Thinking about experiences, and then how does technology, hardware, and software deliver that, as opposed to the other way around. I think we’re really disrupting ourselves.
Meet the new Ford, a Silicon Valley software company

The first iPhone hacker is building a self-driving car

Fascinating Bloomberg article about former-iPhone-hacker George Hotz who has outfitted his Acura with cameras, lidar, and computing power to go for autonomous driving. His plan is to prove that he is able to build better technology and algorithms than companies like Tesla or other car manufacturers.

 

The technology he’s building represents an end run on much more expensive systems being designed by Google, Uber, the major automakers, and, if persistent rumors and numerous news reports are true, Apple. More short term, he thinks he can challenge Mobileye, the Israeli company that supplies Tesla Motors, BMW, Ford Motor, General Motors, and others with their current driver-assist technology. “It’s absurd,” Hotz says of Mobileye. “They’re a company that’s behind the times, and they have not caught up.”
Bloomberg

 

In fact, Hotz has turned down an offer from Elon Musk to work for Tesla.

 

Hotz, though, broke off the talks when he felt that Musk kept changing the terms. “Frankly, I think you should just work at Tesla,” Musk wrote to Hotz in an e-mail. “I’m happy to work out a multimillion-dollar bonus with a longer time horizon that pays out as soon as we discontinue Mobileye.” “I appreciate the offer,” Hotz replied, “but like I’ve said, I’m not looking for a job. I’ll ping you when I crush Mobileye.” Musk simply answered, “OK.”
Bloomberg

 

Hotz plans to get more data and experience with his prototype and then demonstrate it by “filming a video of the Acura outperforming a Tesla across the bridge, and then follow that up by passing the final test on I-405 in Los Angeles where Musk lives.”

Tesla remains skeptic on the success of Hotz, releasing a statement on their website accordingly:

 

We think it is extremely unlikely that a single person or even a small company that lacks extensive engineering validation capability will be able to produce an autonomous driving system that can be deployed to production vehicles. It may work as a limited demo on a known stretch of road — Tesla had such a system two years ago — but then requires enormous resources to debug over millions of miles of widely differing roads.
Tesla

 

Inside of Georg Hotz' Acura - Photographer: Peter Bohler for Bloomberg Businessweek

Inside of George Hotz’ Acura – Photographer: Peter Bohler for Bloomberg Businessweek. http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2015-george-hotz-self-driving-car/

Ride-Hailing Service Didi Kuaidi to Get Backing From China Investment Corp. CIC

The Chinese Uber competitor Didi Kuaidi is ramping up the valuation game with a prominent invest from China’s sovereign-wealth fund CIC. Didi Kuaidi, which was formed by the USD$6 billion merger of the two competing taxi-hailing apps, Kuaidi Dache and Didi Dache, in February has now reached a valuation of USD$15 billion.

While this might be still small compared to Uber’s current boasting USD$50 billion valuation, the potential mid- and long-term implications for Uber in China are interesting. Didi Kuaidi claims to control around 80% of the market, on both taxi hailing as well as premium / limousine booking.

With government-close CIC as investor – and the respective ‘guanxi’ with the authorities, and the close roots to the existing taxi industry, Didi Kuaidi might be much better suited to further establish its presence and dominate the market for ride-hailing. The model of Didi Kuaidi’s operation – going hand in hand with existing providers and offering additional services on top – fundamentally differs from Uber’s ‘let’s disrupt the taxi industry” approach.

Jean Liu – president of Didi Kuaidi – made this point very clear in her talk with the Wallstreet Journal:

 

“We have a unique business model. We provide a comprehensive range of products. We are trying to serve every Chinese in every situation. (…) Our philosophy is we don’t really believe in disruptive termination. When it concerns millions of people’s jobs, and when it concerns tens of millions of people’s life, what we believe in is collaborative reform from within. We try to work with everyone.”
Jean Liu – President Didi Kuaidi